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12300 South Design Build Project, Draper and Riverton, Utah

Project Abstract

The purpose of this project was to reconstruct a six-mile section of urban arterial to address capacity and safety issues, in addition to providing a stimulation to the local economy.



12300 South Design Build Project, Draper and Riverton, Utah: The purpose of this project was to reconstruct a six-mile section of urban arterial to address capacity and safety issues, in addition to providing a stimulation to the local economy.
The purpose of this project was to reconstruct a six-mile section of urban arterial to address capacity and safety issues, in addition to providing a stimulation to the local economy.

This is one of 33 case studies included in National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 642 entitled Quantifying the Benefits of Context Sensitive Solutions, published in November 2009.  According to the authors, “The objective of this project is to develop a guide for transportation officials and professionals that identifies a comprehensive set of performance measures of CSS principles and quantifies the resulting benefits through all phases of project development”. The report documents a wide range of case studies in which the principles of CSS were applied. Each of these case studies was evaluated to determine the benefits of applying CSS. NCHRP Report 642 is available here.

Location: Draper and Riverton, Utah

Lead Agency:
Utah DOT

Contact Person:
Angelo Papastamos, CSS Director

Phase Completed:
Construction/Operation

Source:
Stamatiadis, Nikiforos, et. al. Context Sensitive Solutions: Quantification of the Benefits in Transportation. National Cooperative Highway Research Program – Report 642. 2009.

CSS Qualities


Project Team
UDOT formed a Design-Build Selection Team including Draper City and Riverton City in the development of the contract specifications. The UDOT led selection team awarded the 12300 South Project to GRW Design-Builders. GRW entered into the project knowing that through cohesive teamwork and dedication to CSS the project could be successfully completed in three years with the support of the communities. 

Stakeholders and Public Involvement 
Two Community Coordination Committees were created for Draper City and Riverton City and consisted of residents, community leaders, business owners, and city officials. Each CCC was allocated $400,000 for landscaping and aesthetic improvements that best represented their community.   

Six neighborhood groups were created to effectively listen and respond to the unique needs and concerns of the citizens. GRW met with each group throughout the project to discuss access issues, road restrictions, utility interruption, noise, landscaping, and aesthetics. The CCC was empowered to award up to $2M in incentive to the Contractor based on certain criteria.

The involvement of the community was instrumental in incorporating all landscape and aesthetic treatments that highlighted the natural, historical, and present characteristics of the cities of Draper and Riverton.

Design Solution (process, modes and alternatives examined)
The 12300 South DB Project minimized disruption to the community by implementing UDOT’s first “turn-key” right-of-way program. Approximately 350 property ownerships, 950 individual parcels, and the relocation of 60 business and residences were affected by the construction. UDOT assembled a team of experienced professionals to assist project personnel, local governments and community groups with solving problems of property owners and tenants. The group’s focus and innovative solutions increased the public’s positive perception of the project and UDOT.

CSS Concepts
Wetland impacts for three projects, including the 12300 South project, were combined into meaningful wetland mitigation along the Jordan River. Fifteen acres of property were purchased along the river to allow the Jordan River to meander naturally, producing a more natural environment for wetlands and wildlife habitat.

Draper and Riverton Cities were given a total of $400,000 to lessen historical impacts in their communities by renovating structures of historical significance along the corridor.

Lessons Learned
To help measure the overall success of the project, UDOT conducted a post-construction survey to measure the public’s view of the project. Below are two quotes about the success of the project:

"This is a beautiful project…this corridor makes me feel proud of our communities and what has been done here"
- Draper City Mayor, Darrel Smith

"UDOT no longer measures the success of our projects based solely on how well they serve motorists."
- UDOT Executive Director, John Njord

Costs and time for project delivery were greatly accelerated. If you measure costs and time, compared to what would have happened, without CSS and Design-Build, the project saved an enormous amount of money (50M-100M). If you measure costs to the original budget (horse & buggy thinking), the project went over budget (17M).

CSS Principles


A fundamental aspect of the NCHRP 642  research effort was the identification of CSS principles. The principles below were developed by a multidisciplinary team and were based on previous work by FHWA and AASHTO participants in the 1998 “Thinking Beyond the Pavement” conference, and others.

For this case study, web-based surveys were developed to solicit the expert opinions of the project team on the level of satisfaction from the application of the CSS principles on the project. The analysis of the scores noted in the survey, and presented in the following table, is based on a 4.0 scale, where 4.0 is Strongly Agree, 3.0 is Agree, 2.0 is Disagree, and 1.0 is Strongly Disagree.  Additional information on the data analysis, a summary of the scores for each case study, and general findings (from all case studies) is presented in the NCHRP Report 642, available here.

CSS Principle   

Project Team

Use of interdisciplinary teams

3.8

Involve stakeholders

4.0

Seek broad-based public involvement

3.8

Use full range of communication methods

3.8

Achieve consensus on purpose and need

3.4

Utilize full range of design choices

3.0

Address alternatives and all modes

3.0

Maintain environmental harmony

3.7

Address community & social issues

3.8

Address aesthetic treatments & enhancements

4.0

Consider a safe facility for users & community

4.0

Document project decisions

4.0

Track and meet all commitments

4.0

Create a lasting value for the community

4.0

Use all resources effectively (time & budget)

3.7

Discussion on CSS Principles


Project
Team’s Perspective
There were 5 responses to the survey from project team members. All of the scores represented a high level of agreement with the exception of “Utilize full range of design choices” and “Address alternatives and all modes” (scores of 3.0 from the scale of 4.0). There was consensus opinion of “strongly agree” for the principles related to stakeholder involvement, aesthetic treatments and enhancements, consider a safe facility, document project decisions, track and meet all commitments, and create lasting value for the community. These results indicate unusually favorably opinions from the project team regarding the previously noted principles.

The Utah Department of Transportation set the tone for the project team that fostered teamwork, attention to detail, and a commitment to take every opportunity to meet the needs of the community. The project was awarded to a consortium of design builders and this team was able to interact effectively with the Community Coordination Committees that were created from residence and business owners within each city.  These committees were empowered to make decisions on items such as landscape improvements and other aesthetic improvements for their community. Additionally, the committees were empowered to award $2 million in contractor incentives for efforts regarding public involvement and maintenance of traffic.

CSS Benefits


Surveys were also utilized to ask the project team, as well as external stakeholders in the process, about their perceptions of the benefits derived from a CSS process. As with the surveys regarding CSS Principles, the Benefits were scored on a 4.0 scale, where 4.0 is Strongly Agree, 3.0 is Agree, 2.0 is Disagree, and 1.0 is Strongly Disagree.

CSS Benefit

Measured

Stakeh.

Team

Improved stakeholder/public feedback

NA

4.0

Increased stakeholder/public participation compared to other projects

NA

3.8

Increased stakeholder/public participation

3.0

3.4

Increased stakeholder/public ownership

3.0

3.8

Increased stakeholder/public trust

4.0

3.8

Decreased costs for overall project delivery

NA

3.0

Decreased time for overall project delivery

NA

3.6

Improved predictability of project delivery

3.0

3.8

Improved project scoping

NA

3.4

Improved project budgeting

NA

3.0

Increased opportunities for partnering or shared funding or in-kind resources

3.0

4.0

Improved opportunities for joint use and development

--

3.8

Improved sustainable decisions and investments

NA

3.8

Improved environmental stewardship

NA

3.2

Minimized overall impact to human environment

3.0

3.4

Minimized overall impact to natural environment

3.0

3.6

Improved mobility for all users

4.0

3.8

Improved walkability

4.0

3.8

Improved bikeability

4.0

3.8

Improved safety (vehicles, pedestrians, and bikes)

4.0

4.0

Improved multi-modal options

3.0

2.8

Improved community satisfaction

3.0

3.8

Improved quality of life for community

4.0

3.8

Fit with local government land use plan

3.0

3.8

Improved speed management

3.0

3.6

Design features appropriate to context

4.0

4.0

Optimized maintenance and operations

NA

3.6

Minimized disruption

3.0

3.6

Increased risk management and liability protection

NA

3.0

Discussion on Benefit Values


Semi-Quantitative Benefits
In addition to the five project team members responding to the survey, there was only one stakeholder that responded. For all benefits where a stakeholder opinion was offered, the results indicated either “agree” or “strongly agree”. There were several benefits that were considered to be most favorable in terms of agreement by both the single stakeholder and the five team members. Those benefits included: “Increased stakeholder public/trust”, “Improved mobility for all users”, “Improved walkability”, “Improved bikeability”, “Improved safety”, “Improved quality of life for community”, and Design features appropriate to context”.

Quantitative Benefits
In addition to the semi-quantitative scores obtained above, the following quantitative metrics were obtained for some of the benefits.

CSS Benefit

Metrics

Increased stakeholder/public participation

 

Decreased costs for overall project delivery

Estimated: $65.5 million

Actual: $87.5 million

Decreased time for overall project delivery

 

Improved predictability of project delivery

 

Improved project scoping

88 change orders at cost of $22 million

Improved project budgeting

 

Increased opportunities for partnering or shared funding or in-kind resources

 

Improved environmental stewardship

Change Order No. 2 to relocate Warr Trail – environmental commitment

Minimized overall impact to human environment

$400,000 provided for cities to lessen historical impacts to community

Minimized overall impact to natural environment

Purchased 15 acres along Jordan River for wetland mitigation

Improved mobility for all users

 

Improved walkability

 

Improved bikeability

 

Improved safety (vehicles, pedestrians, and bikes)

 

Improved multi-modal options

 

Improved speed management

Speed studies show 85th above speed limit

Optimized maintenance and operations

Minimal costs for maintenance since 2005 completion

Minimized disruption

 

Increased risk management and liability protection

 

Arnstein Comparison
The surveys conducted for this case study included a set of questions that could be used to evaluate potential differences in the level of satisfaction between project team members and stakeholders. These differences in satisfaction are known as the Arnstein gap, which is a heuristic metric by which the existing quality deficit of public involvement can be measured. Arnstein developed an eight-step scale (Arnstein’s Ladder) characterizing levels of public involvement in planning, ranging from “Manipulation” of the public (non-participation) to “Citizen Control” of the process. The NCHRP 642 authors adapted this approach to assess the perceptions of stakeholders and the project team.

Arnstein Questions Part 1

Stakeh.

Team

I  am satisfied with the relationship we had with project team

3.0

NA

I am satisfied with the relationship I had with the stakeholders

NA

4.0

I am satisfied with the relationship I had with the interested public

NA

3.8

I am satisfied with the procedures and methods that allowed input to project decisions

3.0

4.0

The first four questions of the Arnstein comparison section attempts to evaluate the relative view and perceptions of the project team versus the view and perceptions of the stakeholders. There was a difference between the views of the stakeholder in their relationship with the project team (rating of 3.0 - agree) as compared to the relationship views of project team members with stakeholders (rating of 4.0 – strongly agree) and project team members’ view of their relationship with the interested public (rating of 3.8). Also, satisfaction levels of the stakeholders and the project team in their perception of procedures and methods that allowed input into project decisions was different (3.0 for the stakeholder and 3.9 for project team members).


Arnstein Questions Part 2

Stakeh.

Team

My relationship with the project team was best described as

4.0

NA

My relationship with the stakeholders was best described as

NA

3.2

My relationship with the interested public was best described as

NA

3.0

 


The last three questions of the Arnstein comparison were opinions of relationship roles of the stakeholders with project team members and the role of project team members with the stakeholders and the public. There did appear to be feeling of providing direction and control by the stakeholder when describing their relationship with the project team. In contrast, the project team best described their relationships as primarily that of participation relative to stakeholders and the interested public. This appears to reflect the significant roles that were given to the two Community Coordination Committees representing Draper City and Riverton City.

Overall Level of Success
Six neighborhood groups were created to effectively listen and respond to the unique needs and concerns of the citizens. The involvement of the community was instrumental in incorporating all landscape and aesthetic treatments that highlighted the natural, historical, and present characteristics of the cities of Draper and Riverton.
UDOT assembled a team of experienced professionals to assist project personnel, local governments and community groups with solving problems of property owners and tenants. The group's focus and innovative solutions increased the public's positive perception of the project and UDOT.

 

 


 



The purpose of this project was to reconstruct a six-mile section of urban arterial to address capacity and safety issues, in addition to providing a stimulation to the local economy.     
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The purpose of this project was to reconstruct a six-mile section of urban arterial to address capacity and safety issues, in addition to providing a stimulation to the local economy.     
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