Search fhwa.dot.gov

US route 6-Brooklyn, CT

Project Abstract

U.S. Route 6 is the primary regional arterial carrying east-west traffic between Hartford, Connecticut, and Providence, Rhode Island, and it passes through the Town of Brooklyn about half way between the two cities. Problems to be addressed included replacement of the pavement that had deteriorated due to heavy truck traffic, improvements to the alignment to address safety problems, and improvements to the cross section to facilitate safe operations. Connecticut DOT staff used visualization techniques for one of the first times to help depict designs and discuss alternatives with the townspeople.



480 6 aerial:
Setting U.S. Route 6 is the primary regional arterial carrying east-west traffic between Hartford, Connecticut, and Providence, Rhode Island. U.S. Route 6 passes through the Town of Brooklyn roughly half way between the two cities. Route 6 is a major, principal arterial in rolling terrain operating with 8,000 to 10,000 vehicles per day at relatively high speeds on the approaches to the town. The Route carries substantial through truck traffic. The Town of Brooklyn is typical of small Connecticut towns. The main road proceeds through the center of town. There are many historic and treasured features within the town, including the Town Hall, Unitarian-Universalist Church, the Town Green, an historic Well House, and a 150-year-old Copper Beach Tree. The Center of Brooklyn is designated as the Brooklyn Green Historic District and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. U.S. Route 169, a north-south primary arterial, crosses U.S. Route 6. U.S. Route 169 is a Connecticut Scenic Road and a National Scenic Highway. The existing road for Route 6 is narrow, with narrow or no shoulders in many places. The horizontal and vertical alignment reflect outdated design criteria, produce sight distance deficiencies, and create difficulties for drivers. For much of the project area, residences abut the highway. The difficult alignment and poor sight distance adversely affect drivers entering and exiting driveways. Improvements to U.S. Route 6 were identified as necessary as far back as the 1950s. Planning studies were conducted in the 1970s to investigate the potential for developing an expressway facility on independent alignment parallel to U.S. Route 6. Environmental concerns and opposition to the expressway resulted in it being dropped from consideration in the early 1980s. At that point, it was recognized that improvements to existing east-west corridors, and in particular to U.S. Route 6, were necessary. Problem to be Solved The 5-mile section of U.S. Route 6 was the last segment not upgraded. Problems to be addressed included replacement of the pavement that had deteriorated due to heavy truck traffic, improvements to the alignment to address safety problems, and improvements to the cross section to facilitate safe operations.
Further Reading:
PDF Icon    US Rt 6 - Brooklyn, CT


    
Info Icon
    
Info Icon
    
Info Icon


Related Content:

Feedback, questions, comments, or problems?
email info@contextsensitivesolutions.org

Copyright © 2005 Context Sensitive Solutions.org. All rights reserved.
About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy

United States Department of Transportation - logo
Privacy Policy | Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) | Accessibility | Web Policies & Notices | No Fear Act | Report Waste, Fraud and Abuse | U.S. DOT Home |
USA.gov | WhiteHouse.gov

Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000