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Added Capacity and Noise Walls - SR-527

Project Abstract

This project was developed to address congestion on a section of SR-527 between 164th Street SE and 132nd Street SE. SR 527 highway passes through downtown Mill Creek.



mill creek wa wall 02: Top of Noise Wall Steps Mirrored with Retaining Wall
Top of Noise Wall Steps Mirrored with Retaining Wall
Purpose & Need
This project was developed to address congestion on a section of SR-527 between 164th Street SE and 132nd Street SE. SR 527 highway passes through downtown Mill Creek. This route serves as the main north-south gateway to the city. Rapid commercial and residential development in and around the city of Mill Creek has strained the existing highway's capacity. In the design of the project, the city requested that the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) meet the city's design standards, which are more stringent than WSDOT's own standards.

Context
This project is located in a suburban area north of the city of Everett. Rapid development is occurring in both the commercial and residential land uses. The city is located near environmentally sensitive areas with a number of creeks and wooded areas running through the city. Bicycle and pedestrian traffic is currently limited throughout the corridor, but growth in pedestrian and bicycle traffic is expected. The project is classified as urban, although the highway maintains a rural feel with tree-lined roadsides.

Initial Design Concept
To relieve congestion and increase capacity and mobility, SR- 527 will be widened to five lanes with a bicycle lane in each direction. Work items include walls, drainage, wetland mitigation, and traffic signal modifications.

Funding
The project has funding from WSDOT and the city of Mill Creek. WSDOTÂ’s budget for the original concept was about $26 million. As part of the mitigation for creek impacts, WSDOT contributed $150,000 to the city for the Penny Creek fishpassage culvert retrofit project.
The city of Mill Creek reflected its commitment to the project by contributing some construction costs.

Challenges
- Community collaboration
- Funding for the project
- Construction under traffic
- Environment impact

Solutions
- Public participation
- City contributed more money
- Work with contractor to lessen traffic impacts
- Work on design elements without affecting budget
- Communication with other agencies

Further Reading:
PDF Icon    Added Capacity & Noise Walls, SR-527


Top of Noise Wall Steps Mirrored with Retaining Wall     
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Top of Noise Wall Steps Mirrored with Retaining Wall
Leaf-Relief Top Banner with     
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Leaf-Relief Top Banner with "Tree Bark" Finish Below
Meandering Noise Walls with Retaining Wall Below     
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Meandering Noise Walls with Retaining Wall Below
Project Vicinity Map     
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Project Vicinity Map


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