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Danville-Riverside Bridge and Approach - Pennsylvania

Project Abstract

The project involved replacement of an existing two-lane Parker Through Truss bridge built in 1904 spanning the Susquehanna River, with a new 1,440 foot-long bridge with weathered steel haunched girders. The approach to the old bridge from Danville was on Mill Street, the center of the town's downtown commercial area. The final alignment for the new bridge on this side of the river directs traffic under two blocks of the West Market Street Historic District one block west of Mill Street, creating a 320 foot-long cut and cover structure before transitioning onto the four-lane Continental Boulevard which links to other major traffic routes. The lessons learned in this project process have helped shape PENNDOT's evolving pro-active effort to involve stakeholders earlier and more meaningfully in project planning, design and development.



KENTUCKY  PENN BRIDGE  NEW 2:
Project Description The project involved replacement of an existing two-lane Parker Through Truss bridge built in 1904 spanning the Susquehanna River, with a new 1,440 foot-long bridge with weathered steel haunched girders. The approach to the old bridge from Danville was on Mill Street, the center of the town's downtown commercial area. The final alignment for the new bridge on this side of the river directs traffic under two blocks of the West Market Street Historic District one block west of Mill Street, creating a 320 foot-long cut and cover structure before transitioning onto the four-lane Continental Boulevard which links to other major traffic routes. Purpose and Need Statement The Evaluation of Project Need report was finalized in February 1991. This report was formally presented to the public at a public meeting in Danville in March 1991. The purpose and need statement was not developed based on consensus with all stakeholders, since the Citizens Advisory Committee first met in September, 1991. The report summarized the need for the bridge replacement as follows:
  • A number of structural components are deficient.
  • The structural configuration of the bridge is not a redundant design that would prevent a possible catastrophic collapse in the event of a failure in a structural member.
  • The bridge trusses are susceptible to damage caused by motor vehicles.
  • The bridge has a sub-standard roadway width.
  • The bridge will eventually have to be weight restricted because of its contributing deterioration. Long-term maintenance of the existing bridge is not cost effective because of escalating maintenance costs.
  • Rehabilitation of the bridge would not be prudent because of the adverse socioeconomic impacts caused by even a short-term bridge closing. Rehabilitation would not correct the narrow bridge width nor would it assure that the bridge will continue to be non-weight restricted in the future.
  • The bridge serves as a vital link between the northern Northumberland County area and Danville, providing access for police, fire, and medical services, and for secondary school students.
  • The economic viability of the region is partially based on the ability of businesses to receive raw materials and ship finished goods on a highway system, which is safe and efficient. A weight-restricted river crossing at this location would preclude manufacturers in the Danville-riverside area from using Route 54 to access Interstate 80 or 81.
In addition to the replacement of the steel truss bridge, other project needs and objectives were identified including:
  • The relief of traffic congestion within Danville's Mill Street Business District.
  • The relief of traffic congestion in other areas of Danville and Riverside Boroughs.
  • The reduction of vehicular accidents within the Route 54 corridor.
  • The reduction of traffic noise and vehicle exhaust emissions, particularly within the Danville Historic District.
  • The long-term preservation of historic resources within Danville and Riverside.
  • The transport of agricultural products and services.
  • The improvement of pedestrian access and safety within the study area.
  • The preservation of public parklands within Danville borough.
Context Sensitive Factors A wide range of context sensitive issues were addressed as part of this project including the impact of the bridge approach through Danville on business in the downtown commercial area, the impact of construction on historic properties directly adjacent to the cut and cover section and on the natural environment of the river. Aesthetics and creating a project that would enhance the identity of both Riverside and Danville were also important considerations.

    
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1904 Parker Through Truss Bridge from Riverside at lower right to Danville.
    
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1904 Parker Through Truss Bridge from Riverside at lower right to Danville.
Looking along market street. Tunnel is below concrete brick pavers.
    
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Looking along market street. Tunnel is below concrete brick pavers.
    
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Tunnel under Factory Street from Continental Boulevard side. 
    
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Tunnel under Factory Street from Continental Boulevard side.
Entering tunnel from new bridge.
    
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Entering tunnel from new bridge.


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