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Last Modified: April 20, 2011

For the purposes of roadway planning and design in Georgia, there are five Guiding Principles that define and promote good CSS practices:
- Interdisciplinary Teams
- Community and Stakeholder Focus
- Environmental Sensitivity in Design
- Design Flexibility in Reaching Solutions
- Context-Sensitive Solutions is a Process

These Guiding Principles will allow GDOT roadway design decision-makers and project managers to better balance transportation, land use, economic, social and environmental goals and objectives.

Since every project has a setting or context, CSS can be applied throughout a project's life. Key elements of the CSD/CSS process include managing diverse technical resources, incorporating meaningful public involvement, integrating collaborative solutions to develop multiple alternatives, and maintaining open and honest communications and decision-making processes that are well documented. Listening and clarification of what is being said are key components of the communication plan.

CSD Contact

Christy Poon-Atkins
Transportation Engineer, Georgia DOT 
2 Capitol Square
Atlanta, Georgia 30334
Phone: (404) 562-3638
e-mail

Websites

DOT Website: http://www.dot.state.ga.us
Public Outreach Website: http://www.dot.state.ga.us/informationcenter/publicinformation/Pages/PublicOutreach.aspx
Example Projects: http://www.dot.state.ga.us/informationcenter/activeprojects/Pages/default.aspx

CSD Manual

In April 2006, GDOT published the GDOT Context Sensitive Design Online Manual. The manual is a new online tool to help develop transportation solutions. The manual provides a comprehensive source of information and links to GDOT policies and other manuals.

The purpose of this Online Manual is to provide GDOT management, staff, consultants, and other practitioners with the latest research and development information regarding CSD/CSS best practices in Georgia and throughout the country. It sets out policy guidelines and procedures for communication strategies, design flexibility, environmental sensitivity, and stakeholder involvement which GDOT project managers and design engineers can use to achieve successful context-sensitive solutions.

The Online Manual also offers project examples in Georgia and in other states that demonstrate good CSS practices. These examples offer lessons learned to further the work GDOT will do in promoting excellence in transportation planning and design.

CSD Training

Since 2001, GDOT has trained nearly 100 designers, project managers, and consultants. Sessions of the FHWA/National Highway Institute class are scheduled and conducted each year.

Last Modified: April 20, 2011

Feedback, questions, comments, or problems?
email info@contextsensitivesolutions.org

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