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Excerpt Icon Alternatives Development: Engaging Stakeholders in Identification of Alternatives
"Engage stakeholders in alternative identification. This is the most creative part of the project development process, in which sets of solutions are crafted in response to the problem statement and the evaluation criteria. Alternatives are generally... more
Transportation Research Board (TRB),
from NCHRP Report 480: A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions,2002
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Excerpt Icon Considering Scale
People driving in a car see the world at a much different scale than people walking on the street. This large discrepancy in the design scale for a car versus the design scale for people has changed the overall planning of our communities.
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Context Assessment
In order for a designer to be sensitive to the projects surrounding environment, he or she must consider its context and physical location carefully during this stage of project planning. Some of these issues to be considered are; the physical... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Bicycles
"Bicycles are...a viable mode of transportation..., both for commuting and recreation." Bicycles can use a shared lane, a wide outside lane, a regular designated bicycle lane, a shoulder or a multi-use path according to the specific context and... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Clear Zones
A clear zone is "the unobstructed, ... flat area provided beyond the edge of the traveled way for the recovery of errant vehicles ... The width of the clear zone is influenced by ... traffic volume, design speed of the highway,and slope of the... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Curbs
There are two types of curbs: barrier and mountable. Both in urban and suburban environments curbs serve functions such as drainage control, roadway edge delineation, and right-of-way reduction.
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Introduction
Cross-section elements define the highway right-of-way. This section describes each element and related factors effecting the design of the roadway.
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Lane Width
"The width of travel lanes is limited by the physical dimensions of automobiles and trucks to a range between 2.7 and 3.6 m (9 and 12 ft)." Surrounding context and speed are factors determining the necessary minimum lane width.
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Shoulders
"Shoulders increase safety and highway capacity and provide a place for pedestrians and bicyclists when no sidewalks are provided.... The treatment of shoulders is important from a number of perspectives, including safety, the capacity of the highway... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Traffic barriers
"The purpose of the barrier... [is] to minimize the severity of potential accidents involving vehicles leaving the traveled way where the consequences of errant vehicles striking a barrier are less than leaving the roadway....A wide variety of... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Cross-Section Elements: Travel Lanes
"The number of lanes needed for a facility is usually determined during the concept stage of project development. It is usually the number of lanes necessary to accommodate the expected traffic volumes at a level of service determined to be... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Decision Points
The CSD/CSS Project Development Process includes a recommended set of decision points. These points are related to federal requirements under NEPA as well as state and local regulations.
Transportation Research Board (TRB),
from NCHRP Report 480: A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions,2002
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Excerpt Icon Evaluating Your Historic Road
This list of questions will help you define your historic road and the issues facing it.
National Trust for Historic Preservation,
from Saving Historic Roads: Design & Policy Guidelines
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Excerpt Icon Historic Roads Defined
In general, historic roads are roads that, through design, experience, or association, have contributed to our culture in a meaningful way. The type of road, its history, and current condition will determine the most appropriate action for... more
National Trust for Historic Preservation,
from Saving Historic Roads: Design & Policy Guidelines
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Excerpt Icon Implementation: Maintaining Communication through Construction
An extensive outreach program should continue during construction in order to address stakeholder interest and to communicate any changes in the project.
Transportation Research Board (TRB),
from NCHRP Report 480: A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions,2002
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Excerpt Icon Planning for Implementation
Implementation planning involves integrating the selected public involvement activities into the total project scope, schedule, and budget, and obtaining final buy-in from management.
Transportation Research Board (TRB),
from NCHRP Report 480: A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions,2002
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Excerpt Icon Right-of-Way, Construction and Maintenance
Maintenance post-construction, involvement of design team in the implementation phase.Once the final designs have been prepared and needed right-of-way is purchased, construction bid packages are made available, a contractor is selected, and... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Road Width
The design element with the greatest effect on the scale of the roadway is its width, or cross section. Elements (or a lack of elements) along the roadside also contribute to the perceived width of the road and can even affect the speed at which... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon Sidewalks and Pedestrian Paths
"[Sidewalks accomodate] pedestrians along the traveled way ... [and they are] equally important as the provision for vehicles ... The sidewalk can either be placed flush with the roadside edge ... or next to a buffer area, such as a planted strip,... more
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
from Flexibility in Highway Design
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Excerpt Icon The Most Important Law of the 20th Century
"The 91st Congress enacted the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), considered by many to be the most important law of the 20th century. ...In tandem with NEPA, the 91st Congress also added a new subsection ...focusing on design criteria... more
Transportation Research Board (TRB),
from Context-Sensitive Design: Will the Vision Overcome Liability Concerns?
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