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Quote Icon Assure that possible adverse economic, social, and environmental effects have been fully considered and that the final decision is in the best overall public interest...
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Quote Icon Roads that follow the topography require minimal cut and fill, which reduces the impact on landforms and the cost of hauling out excess material.
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon "The definition of community requires consideration of both people and place. The people might include the total population of any geographic place or one or more identifiable smaller groups of people. Sometimes a community might include people... more
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),
from Community Culture and the Environment: A Guide to Understanding a Sense of Place
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Quote Icon "CSD (CSS) is an approach that considers the total context within which a transportation project will exist."
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Info Tab Icon
Quote Icon "CSS unsettles some of us transportation "experts", because we fear that we might end up with a project that looks very different than we originally envisioned. So we try to control the outcome by holding a tight rein on the process. One of the... more
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Quote Icon Cultural Qualities are not necessarily expressed in the landscape; rather, culture encompasses all aspects of a communitys life. Cultural information about a community includes:... more
National Scenic Byways Program,
from Byway Beginnings: Understanding, Inventorying, and Evaluating a Byway's Intrinsic Qualities
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Quote Icon Curbs along roadways can separate pedestrian areas from vehicle areas, direct runoff, and define medians ans parking islands. You may want to consider alternatives to concrete when planning for curbs. Depending on the byway character and budget,... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon If constructed with care, cut slopes and fill slopes can contribute to the scenic quality along your byway by creating variation along the roadway and exposing the underlying geology. The most important objective is the log term stability of the... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon As visitors drive along a scenic byway, they are focused on the surrounding scenery. They are probably not aware of the number of driving lanes, width of the driving lanes, shoulder width, construction materials, sharpness of the curves, how rock... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon Fences and walls can make a positive contribution to the character of byways. Sometimes, they are one of the defining features of an area, such as the white horse fences of Kentucky or the stone walls of Kansas. There are almost as many types of... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon "Focus on mobility incites sprawl. I see mobility as a problem, not a solution. Building more sprawl-inducing roads is going to decrease mobility in the long term."
Dan Burden Info Tab Icon
Quote Icon "Highway projects can be designed with imagination, creativity, and collaboration to preserve and enhance the character and quality of a community without sacrificing transportation mobility and safety."
American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officals (AASHTO) Info Tab Icon
Quote Icon Medians and parking islands can have major influence on the character of a byway. Medians can serve to separate opposing traffic, provide a recovery area for out-of-control vehicles, allow space for turn lanes, minimize headlight glare, and provide... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon Park roads are for leisurely driving only. If you are in a hurry, you might do well to take another road, and come back when you have more time.
National Park Service (NPS),
from NCHRP Report 480: A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions,1984
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Quote Icon Retaining walls may be necessary where natural terrain is steep or to limit disturbance to environmentally sensitive areas. When the surface and structure of a wall complement the character of the byway, they can help reduce the visual impacts of... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon Many scenic roads get their character in part from their history. Meandering roads that follow the banks of a river, wind through narrow canyons, or skirt the cliffs of mountains and high mesas often began as a foot trail or wagon road. As travel... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon Many aspects of roadway improvements are governed by State, local, and agency standards. However, there are also many conventions that are not actually standards. The creative planner or designer can propose alternatives as long as safety and... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon TBTP is an approach that will enhance good engineering.
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Quote Icon The type of traffic barriers you choose is an important consideration along scenic byways. Barriers help prevent motorists form striking a more hazardous object or from sliding down a steep slope. However, since these structures line the roadway,... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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Quote Icon Vegetation management can be used to enhance the scenic quality of a byway and to screen elements that detract from the scenic quality. Vegetation can also be integral to the visitors experience by providing a variety of spaces for the motorist to... more
USDA Forest Service,
from Scenic Byways: A Design Guide for Roadside Improvements
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