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The Asphalt Rebellion

For decades, traffic engineers have been designing wider, straighter, faster roads. Now, some communities are challenging that approach.

The asphalt rebellion seems to begin, in just about every state, at a bridge. It is a country bridge: lightly traveled, decades old and starting to fall apart. The local government wants a few modest repairs. The state transportation department comes in, takes a look and declares that the only way to save the bridge is to tear it down and build something much bigger and costlier in its place. A fight ensues. By the time it is over, a mild-mannered mayor or council member or selectman has turned into a rebel. For decades, traffic engineers have been designing wider, straighter, faster roads. Now, some communities are challenging that approach.

The asphalt rebellion seems to begin, in just about every state, at a bridge. It is a country bridge: lightly traveled, decades old and starting to fall apart. The local government wants a few modest repairs. The state transportation department comes in, takes a look and declares that the only way to save the bridge is to tear it down and build something much bigger and costlier in its place. A fight ensues. By the time it is over, a mild-mannered mayor or council member or selectman has turned into a rebel.

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More Information: sustainable.state.fl.us/fdi/fscc/news/world/asphalt1.htm



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