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Traffic Calm a Street

An outline process for developing, implementing, and evaluating the results of a traffic calming plan for a single street or street segment.

4.3 Traffic Calm a Street

 

The following is an outline process for developing, implementing, and evaluating the results of a traffic calming plan for a single street or street segment

 

• Meet with residents from the street to discuss the nature of the problem and potential solutions. A residents committee would be struck to work with City staff.

• Residents committee and local government staff meet to design a preliminary traffic calming plan.

• Survey residents for their opinion on the preliminary traffic calming plan (either a vote or a request for comments back).

• Report to elected officials for approval and funding authority.

• Inform the residents of elected officials action, next steps and timetable.

• Permanently implement the traffic calming measures.

• After six months, measure the traffic impacts of the calming measures including the i mpacts on neighboring streets to ensure traffic (above an acceptable amount) has not been diverted.

• Adjust calming measures if justified based on traffic impacts.

• The local government could define an acceptable level of traffic diversion onto neighboring streets, monitor actual diversion levels and take corrective action if the acceptable levels are exceeded.




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