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Lane Widths

Lane Widths
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In CSS projects, designers are using the flexibility inherent in design criteria and standards to select a lane width that is appropriate to a site's context, the desired vehicular speed, and types of vehicles served, recognizing that roadway space is often constrained and excess space for vehicles can be given over to other purposes, such as wider sidewalks for pedestrians or a bicycle lane.

Excerpt IconExcerpt Considering Scale
People driving in a car see the world at a much different scale than people walking on the street. This large discrepancy in the design scale for a car versus the design scale for people has changed the overall planning of our communities. more...
from  Flexibility in Highway Design
Excerpt IconExcerpt Road Width
The design element with the greatest effect on the scale of the roadway is its width, or cross section. Elements (or a lack of elements) along the roadside also contribute to the perceived width of the road and can even affect the speed at which motorists travel. more...
from  Flexibility in Highway Design
Excerpt IconExcerpt Cross-Section Elements: Travel Lanes
"The number of lanes needed for a facility is usually determined during the concept stage of project development. It is usually the number of lanes necessary to accommodate the expected traffic volumes at a level of service determined to be appropriate for the facility." more...
from  Flexibility in Highway Design
Excerpt IconExcerpt Cross-Section Elements: Lane Width
"The width of travel lanes is limited by the physical dimensions of automobiles and trucks to a range between 2.7 and 3.6 m (9 and 12 ft)." Surrounding context and speed are factors determining the necessary minimum lane width. more...
from  Flexibility in Highway Design
Article Icon Article / Paper / Report Road Diets: Fixing the Big Roads
Nationwide, engineers are putting roads on "diets," helping them lose lanes and width. In the process formerly "fat" streets often become leaner, safer, and more efficient. They become multi-modal and more productive. In many cases these former "warrior" roadways are tamed and turned into "angels."
--  Dan Burden
Excerpt IconExcerpt Lane Width: Flexibility in the AASHTO Guidelines
The AASHTO Green Book (2) recognizes the need for flexibility and provides that flexibility, citing how lane width can be tailored, to a degree, to fit the particular environment in which the roadway functions (e.g., low-volume rural roads or residential areas versus higher volume rural or urban facilities). The formulation of these values demonstrates considerable flexibility.  more...
from  A Guide for Achieving Flexibility in Highway Design
Excerpt IconExcerpt Lane Width: Mitigating Narrow Lanes
The operational and safety effects of lane width are combined with those of other cross sectional elements. Knowledge of the total effects of lane width, shoulder width, and the roadside offers insights into mitigation when less than desirable lane widths may be necessary. more...
from  A Guide for Achieving Flexibility in Highway Design
Excerpt IconExcerpt Shoulder Width: Flexibility in the AASHTO Guidelines
The AASHTO Green Book (2) suggests flexibility for tradeoffs in lane and shoulder widths provided a minimum roadway width is achieved.  more...
from  A Guide for Achieving Flexibility in Highway Design
San Bernardino
San Bernardino, CA
"...a vision for the rebirth of downtown San Bernardino, one that builds upon the steady progress of a revitalization effort already in the works and that directly responded to the needs the community revealed."
Highway through Aabenraa, Denmark
Aabenraa,
"The three-km-long, heavily trafficked highway through Aabenraa has been converted according to the principles of environmentally adapted through roads, with due respect paid, however, to the substantial traffic flow. This has reduced car speeds, has made a coherent bicycle route network, has resulted in a falling number of accidents, and has increased the feeling of security for the light road users."
Shopping Street in Vordingborg, Denmark
Vordingborg,
"The main shopping street in Vordingborg, Algade, has been converted from a one-way street to partly a pedestrian street, partly a 30 km/h street with commercial traffic allowed in both directions. The conversion has embellished the street and reduced car traffic volume and speeds considerably."
Town Street in Naestved, Denmark
Naevstved,
"As part of an extensive reconstruction of the street network in the town center of Naestved, Ramsherred has been converted to a pedestrian street with one-way business-related motor car traffic allowed. What used to be an ordinary town street with much too narrow sidewalks is now in its entire width designed on the premises of the light road users."
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Lane Widths
Isaaquah, WA
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Lane Widths
Dusseldorf
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Lane Widths
Portland, OR
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Lane Widths
Santa Barbara, CA
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Lane Widths
Abacoa, FL
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Lane Widths

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Lane Widths

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Lane Widths

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Lane Widths

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Lane Widths

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Lane Widths
Dusseldorf
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Copenhagen
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Lane Widths
Copenhagen
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Lane Widths

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Lane Widths

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