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Community Impact Assessment



The Florida DOT defines CIA as: "the process to evaluate the effects of a transportation action on communities and their quality of life - the human environment. Its focus is on the early and continuous gathering of information from the community and other sources. This information is used as input into transportation decision making throughout the planning, project development, design, mitigation, and construction of a project."

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Community Impact Assessment



Excerpt IconExcerpt The Impact of Transportation on Livability
When transportation is people-oriented, it can help build communities and restore community life. It can provide the accessibility and exposure that helps develop business. It can allow for entrepreneurial opportunities by molding public spaces and transportation facilities that can nurture start-up enterprises. It can spur the identity and cohesiveness that bring communities together and help them grow and become safer and more attractive. more...
from  The Role of Transit in Creating Livable Metropolitan Communities
Article Icon Article / Paper / Report Evaluating Transportation Land Use Impacts
This report describes the various costs and benefits of different land use patterns, including the opportunity cost of land used for roads and parking facilities, accessibility and transportation costs, costs of providing public services, neighborhood livability and community cohesion, greenspace and habitat, preservation of cultural resources, energy consumption and pollution emissions, housing affordability, pedestrian conditions, aesthetic impacts, and equity impacts.
-- Todd Litman, Victoria Transportation Policy Institute
Article Icon Article / Paper / Report Community Impact Assessment
The Florida DOT defines CIA as:"The process to evaluate the effects of a transportation action on communities and their quality of life - the human environment. It's focus is on the early and continuous gathering of information from the community and other sources. This information is used as input into transportation decisionmaking throughout the planning, project development, design, mitigation, and construction of a project."
--  Federal Highway Administration
Article Icon Article / Paper / Report Finalizing the Preliminary Community Profile Using "Soft Data" Gathered through Community Involvement
Using soft data and community involvement provides a number of ways to get to know the unique aspects of a community. Basically, soft data is information gathered about the community, its needs, and its values. It might be easiest to define "soft data" by comparing it with "hard data." Hard data is kind of like a layer of bricks, where each brick represents a piece of concrete information, facts and figures. Hard data equates to census data, economics. It gives you a picture of a place at one point in time, and it's not easy to say whether or not you can replicate that data in the future.
--  Project for Public Spaces
Transportation Research Board (TRB)

Article Icon Article / Paper / Report Developing a Preliminary Community Profile Using Hard Data
One of the first and most important tasks in doing CIA is developing a community profile. Community profiling allows us to gain an understanding of the community as a whole, as well as individual neighborhoods within the community and special groups and populations. In general, a community profile involves the following:

1. Summarize the Past, Present, and Recently Anticipated Future of a Place
2. Assess Community Trends and Conditions (Past and Current)
3. Take an Inventory of Study Area Features
4. Identify Community Issues
5. Summary of Findings
--  Transportation Research Board (TRB)
Route 29 - Trenton, New Jersey
Trenton, NJ
The project is known as the Route 29 Highway Tunnel. There were many context sensitive factors in this project stemming from the project location that impacted residences in two historic districts and the National Register Riverview Cemetery and extended to the environmentally sensitive Delaware River. Given that residents knew that the approved EIS allowed revisiting of rebuilding Route 29, it was clear from the beginning that community involvement and responsiveness to community interests and concerns would be essential to getting the project built.

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