Search fhwa.dot.gov

Benefits of CSS

As an approach to transportation, CSS has spread rapidly since 1998. In large part this is because CSS practitioners and advocates understand and embrace its many important benefits:

1. Improved predictability of project delivery
2. Improved project scoping and budgeting
3. Improved long term decisions and investments
4. Improved environmental stewardship
5. Optimized maintenance and operations
6. Increased risk management and liability protection
7. Improved stakeholder/public feedback
8. Increased stakeholder/public participation, ownership, and trust
9. Decreased costs for overall project delivery
10. Decreased time for overall project delivery
11. Increased partnering opportunities
12. Minimized overall impact to human and natural environment
13. Improved mobility for users
14. Improved walkability and bikeability
15. Improved safety (vehicles, pedestrians, and bikes)
16. Improved multi-modal options (including transit)
17. Improved community satisfaction
18. Improved quality of life for community
19. Improved speed management
20. Design features appropriate to context
21. Minimized construction related disruption
22. Improved opportunities for economic development

—Information taken from Context Sensitive Solutions: Quantification of the Benefits in Transportation, NCHRP 15-3, Principal Investigator: Nikiforos Stamatiadis



Article Icon Article / Paper / Report Benefits of CSS - CSS Quick Facts
Agencies that have institutionalized CSS confirm that real, measurable benefits accrue to the agency, and ultimately to taxpayers and constituents of their states. Agencies can derive multiple benefits by integrating CSS into their day-to-day decisions and operations.
Article Icon Article / Paper / Report NCHRP Report 642 – Quantifying the Benefits of Context Sensitive Solutions
As more organizations apply CSS principles, evidence continues to grow that measurable benefits result from this broadly informed and flexible approach to all phases of transportation decision making. Involving stakeholders in decision making yields transportation solutions that balance environmental, engineering, community, mobility, funding, and safety needs with the minimum of delay and controversy.

This report presents guidelines for quantifying the benefits of applying the principles of Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) to transportation projects. The report will be of immediate interest to the staff of state and municipal agencies with responsibility for planning, programming, developing, and operating transportation projects of all types and sizes.

The following table, excerpted from NCHRP Report 642, contains a listing of the 33 Case Studies, organized by region, with hyperlinks to the individual case studies.

Additional Reading:

NCHRP Report 642 – Quantifying the Benefits of Context Sensitive Solutions



State

Project Name

Abstract

West

AZ

 

 

SR 179 Reconstruction- Sedona, Coconino County, AZ

A road reconstruction project complete through the planning phase for a mixed urban, rural and parkland multi-modal corridor (transit, pedestrian, bicycles) addressing 12 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams and stakeholders with excellent public involvement and demonstrating stakeholder, shared funding, environmental, community, multi-modal, and safety benefits.

CA

 

 

Mandela Pkwy Corridor Improvement, Oakland, CA

An under construction roadway reconstruction project with 14 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary team, very good stakeholder involvement, demonstrating stakeholder, joint development opportunities, environmental, safety, multi-modal, and community benefits.

CO

 

 

US 40 Berthoud Mt. Pass Reconstruction-Clear Creek Co., CO

An interstate reconstruction and environmental improvement project completed for a rural/parkland corridor involving 14 CSS principles including good use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent use of stakeholders and good public involvement and demonstrating stakeholder, multi-modal, safety, environmental, maintenance & operations and community benefits.

CO

 

 

US 285, Denver, CO

A road reconstruction project complete through the planning phase for a rural corridor involving all 15 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, involving all stakeholders, broad based public involvement, achieving consensus on purpose and need and maintaining environmental harmony, considering a safe facility for users & community, documenting project decisions, and creating lasting value for the community.

CO

 

 

Transportation Expansion (TREX) Project, Denver, CO

A completed urban multi-modal corridor (public transit, pedestrians and bicycles) with 10 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams and stakeholder involvement, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, safety, project delivery time, multi-modal mobility and community benefits.

MT

 

 

SR 69, Main Street Reconstruction, Boulder, MT

A completed urban main street reconstruction project in a multimodal corridor (pedestrian and bicycles) with 10 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, good involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, construction and project costs, safety, project delivery and community benefits.

ND

 

 

North Dakota-Four Bears Bridge-Ft. Berthoud Reservation, ND

A road reconstruction/bridge replacement project completed for a multi-modal rural corridor (pedestrian, bicycles) involving 14 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent use of stakeholders and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, safety, environmental and community benefits.

TX

 

 

FM 1120, Low Water Crossing, Real County, TX

A completed rural, low water crossing replacement over the Frio River with 15 CSS principles including excellent multidisciplinary team, stakeholder involvement, and public involvement plan; demonstrating reduced project costs and time, environmental, stakeholder, multi-modal and community benefits.

UT

 

 

12300 South Design Build Project, Draper and Riverton, UT

A completed urban highway reconstruction project with 15 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, joint development opportunities, environmental, and community benefits.

WA

 

 

SR 99 Pacific Hwy South Reconstruction, Des Moines, WA

A completed multi-modal roadway reconstruction project in a multimodal corridor (transit, pedestrian and bicycle) with 12 CSS principles including good use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent stakeholder involvement, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, joint development opportunities, environmental, multi-modal, and community benefits.

WA

 

 

Bridgeport Way Reconstruction, University Place, WA

A road diet completed urban project in a multi-modal corridor (transit, pedestrian, bicycles) with 9 CSS principles including very good use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement plan and demonstrating stakeholder, community and multi-modal benefits.

WY

 

 

US 14/16/20, Reconstruction, Cody - Yellowstone N.P., WY

A completed rural roadway reconstruction project in a park setting with 10 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent stakeholder involvement, and very good public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, project delivery costs, safety, and community benefits.

Southeast

AR

 

 

Rt. 215, Ozark National Forest (NW Arkansas), AR

A completed rural highway project in a national forest corridor using seven CSS principles (and associated benefits) including good use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, excellent consensus on purpose and need and excellent environmental harmony demonstrating stakeholder, environmental and quality of life benefits.

FL

 

 

I-4 Reconstruction, Tampa, FL

An interstate/local roads/overpass reconstruction project under construction (2007 est. completion) for a multi-modal urban corridor (transit, pedestrian, bicycles) in a metropolitan area involving 14 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent use of stakeholders and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, shared funding, environmental, community, safety, and project delivery cost benefits.

KY

 

 

US27/68 Paris Pike, Reconstruction, Lexington - Paris, KY

A completed rural roadway reconstruction project with 10 CSS principles including excellent use of an interdisciplinary team, excellent stakeholder involvement, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, project delivery costs, safety, and community benefits.

KY

 

 

Kentucky-Cemetery Road Reconstruction-Bowling Green, KY

A road reconstruction/interchange-overpass construction project completed for a multi-modal urban corridor (pedestrian, bicycles) involving 12 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent use of stakeholders and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, shared funding, environmental, community, project delivery costs, and safety benefits.

KY

 

 

Transportation Tomorrow, TARC, Louisville, KY

A planning study for light rail in the preliminary design phase involving 10 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent use of stakeholders and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, community, and multi-modal benefits.

NC

 

 

Smith Creek Parkway, Wilmington, NC

A completed coastal urban highway and rail project using 14 CSS principles and associated benefits including good use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, community and safety benefits.

SC

 

 

Cooper River Bridge Replacement Project, Charleston, SC

A bridge replacement project in Charleston Harbor, SC, with multimodal (pedestrian and bicycle) facilities utilizing 9 CSS principles including interdisciplinary teams, involve all stakeholders, broad based public involvement, full range of communication methods, consider all alternatives and modes, community & social issues, aesthetic treatments & enhancements, safe facility for users & community, and use all resources effectively.

TN

 

 

SR 73/US 321, Gateway Project, Gatlinburg, TN

A completed 5-lane retrofit rural project in a tourist area with a multimodal corridor (pedestrian and bicycle) with 8 CSS principles including excellent stakeholder involvement, excellent public involvement plan, and very good interdisciplinary team; as well as demonstrating stakeholder, aesthetic (retaining walls and plants), multi-modal, and community benefits.

Northeast

CT

 

 

Oyster River Roundabout, West Haven, CT

A completed roundabout installation project maintaining environmental harmony, addressing aesthetic treatments (gateway) and enhancements with excellent stakeholder involvement, excellent public involvement for delivering a safe facility that improves mobility for all users and meeting all commitments.

DC

 

 

M St. & Wisconsin Ave. Sidewalk Reconstruct, Georgetown, DC

A coordinated sidewalk reconstruction/utilities upgrading project currently under construction for a historic corridor involving 4 CSS principles including good use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent use of stakeholders and good public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, project delivery cost s, environmental, and community benefits.

MD

 

 

MD 75, Rehabilitation, Town of Union Bridge, MD

A rehabilitation and improvement of a Main Street completed urban project in a pedestrian corridor with 9 CSS principles including very good use of interdisciplinary team s, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating community, partnering, stakeholder , and project savings benefits.

MD

 

 

US 1, Planning Study, College Park, MD

A planning study to improve an urban section in a multi-modal corridor (transit, bicycles, and pedestrians) with 8 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, multi- modal, and community benefits.

ME

 

 

Rt. 26, Shaker Village Bypass, Sabbathday Village, ME

A completed rural (small community) roadway improvement project in a historic corridor with 13 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, safety, project delivery and community benefits.

PA

 

 

Mon/Fayette Expressway, PA

A project in preliminary design in a multi-modal corridor (pedestrian and bicycles) using 14 CSS principles including excellent stakeholder involvement, excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, and very good public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, safety, community, and project delivery benefits.

Mississippi Valley

IA

 

 

Highway 1, Keosauqua Bridge, IA

A completed historic bridge replacement project that exemplifies the utilization of a full range of design choices involving stakeholders and public while maintaining environmental harmony, addressing aesthetic treatments and enhancements, considering a safe facility for users and the community and improving safety along with bikeability and walkability.

IL

 

 

Prairie Pkwy Phase 1 Engineering Study-Kane, Kendall, Will LaSalle and DeKalk Counties, IL

A preliminary engineering study to identify multi-modal rural and urban corridors (transit) involving 12 CSS principles including good use of interdisciplinary teams, good use of stakeholders and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, project delivery costs, environmental, multi-modal, safety and community benefits.

MI

 

 

US 131, kitcS-curve Replacement, Grand Rapids, MI

A completed urban bridge reconstruction adjacent to a multi-modal corridor (pedestrian and bicycles) with 15 CSS principles including excellent use of interdisciplinary teams, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement plan demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, safety, multi-modal, project delivery and community benefits.

MN

 

 

TH 61 North Shore Dr., Reconstruction, Good Harbor Bay, MN

A completed rural roadway reconstruction project with 10 CSS principles including a very good use of an interdisciplinary team, excellent stakeholder participation, and very good public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, environmental, safety, and community benefits.

OH

 

 

Euclid Corridor Transportion Project, Clevealnd, OH

A transit improvement project in the planning phase with 10 CSS principles including a very good use of multi-disciplinary team, excellent involvement of stakeholders, and excellent public involvement demonstrating stakeholder, multi-modal, joint development, and community benefits.

OH

 

 

Eastern Corridor, Southwestern OH

A regional planning study examining long range transportation improvements including light-rail, bicycle facilities and expanded transit services, that utilized 7 CSS principles including involve all stakeholders, seek broad-based public involvement, use full range of communication methods, consider all alternatives and modes, community & social issues, provide a safe facility for users & community, and a lasting value for the community.


Excerpt IconExcerpt How Context Sensitive Streets Can Help Create a More Livable Community
How context sensitive streets can help create more livable communities; some of the varied transportation needs and objectives that are typically considered in CSSD. more...
from  Context Sensitive Street Design
Excerpt IconExcerpt The Business Case for CSD/CSS
Agencies that have institutionalized CSD/CSS confirm that real, measurable benefits accrue to the agency and ultimately the taxpayers and constituents of their states.  more...
from  NCHRP Report 480: A Guide to Best Practices for Achieving Context Sensitive Solutions
Article Icon Traffic Calming Benefits, Costs and Equity Impacts
"This paper describes a framework for evaluating traffic calming programs. Potential benefits include road safety, increased comfort and mobility for non-motorized travel, reduced environmental impacts, increased neighborhood interaction, and increased property values. Traffic calming can help create more livable communities and reduce suburban sprawl. Traffic calming costs can include project expenses, liability claims, vehicle delay, traffic spillover, problems for emergency and service vehicles, driver frustration, and problems for bicyclists and visually impaired pedestrians."
-- T. A. Litman, Victoria Transport Policy Institute

Feedback, questions, comments, or problems?
email info@contextsensitivesolutions.org

Copyright © 2005 Context Sensitive Solutions.org. All rights reserved.
About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy

United States Department of Transportation - logo
Privacy Policy | Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) | Accessibility | Web Policies & Notices | No Fear Act | Report Waste, Fraud and Abuse | U.S. DOT Home |
USA.gov | WhiteHouse.gov

Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000